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Hunterdon

Hunterdon is the place to be for active seniors, and there’s lots of them

Hunterdon is the place to be for active seniors, and there’s lots of them

Reposted from NewJerseyHills.com

“A study shows there will be more senior citizens in Hunterdon County than kids below the age of 18 within 10 years,” said Councilman Al Rylak at a Clinton Town Council meeting last month.

Although considered a high-priced area in which to live, Hunterdon County can be a great place for retirees even if their pocketbooks aren’t as “flush” as some of their neighbors. In other words, you don’t have to be wealthy to find a lot to do with your spare time. The county has a wealth of senior citizen groups with a lot to offer. Some adhere strictly to age restrictions of 65 or more, but others generously welcome younger folks in their 50s.

In the northern part of the county, there are a number of cost-effective opportunities for seniors, mostly run by the seniors themselves. Some towns support their activities by providing places for them to meet or with other contributions, but in most cases today’s seniors are a generation that like to make their own rules and choices.

If you are now retired, consider reaching out to one or more of the following groups to meet old friends, make new friends, and add a bit of entertainment to your daily life. If you no longer drive, perhaps you can connect with a fellow senior citizen willing to bring you along.

The largest group in the area is the completely self-sustaining Clinton Township Seniors Club (CTSC) with a membership of 80 plus. They do not receive any support from local government, leaving them free to not only choose what activities they can pursue, but removing all age and residency requirements municipally-run senior programs often impose.

The CTSC meets at 10 a.m. on the second Wednesday of each month in the Annandale Reformed Church on the corner of West Street and Beaver Avenue. Most meetings offer speakers or activities of a wide variety.

What has really drawn a large membership to the CTSC though, is that they are day-trippers. It is an opportunity to go places without having to drive great distances. Just sign up, drive to Annandale and hop on the bus. The club has no age or residency restrictions, but of course virtually everyone is over the age of 55 since anyone younger is probably at work on weekdays. It is a club of seniors living within a 15-20 mile radius of Annandale.

This year’s monthly trip itinerary included Broadway plays as well as performances at a variety of venues in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. On Tuesday, May 15, the bus is full for a trip to Lancaster, Pa. In July they’ll be taking the Spirit of New Jersey Cruise, luncheon included. To learn more about the club, call club president Sandy Pill at (908) 404-5448.

Although it is one of Hunterdon’s smallest towns, Lebanon Borough has a very active senior group. In addition to their monthly meetings at 10 a.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month with interesting programs and refreshments; fun bingo from 1-3 p.m. on the second and fourth Mondays of each month; and chair yoga exercises from 11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. The Lebanon group is independent of the Borough government, but enjoy the benefit of being allowed to hold all of their meetings and other activities in Borough Hall on High Street. They just held a luncheon to celebrate their 13th anniversary, complete with magician-comic Rick Vale.

Like virtually all of the senior groups in northern Hunterdon, the Lebanon group also enjoy day trips. They will be going to the Mt. Airy Casino in June and Manasquan’s Crystal Point Yacht Club in July. They are also planning a 3-day trip to the PA Amish country in late September.

One problem all the clubs have had to deal with when it comes to excursions is being able to fill a bus. No one could afford renting a bus for only a handful of travelers. In Lebanon, there are 15 resident members and 20 that live in surrounding communities. So, they cooperatively travel with another small senior group in Bound Brook, which has 40 to 50 members, to have enough travelers to fill a bus. For more information, call club president Maddie Nolan at (908) 287-7949.

Another club that had been somewhat dormant for a while but has now reactivated is the Senior Club of Oldwick, which meets at 10 a.m. on the second Monday of each month in the Oldwick Firehouse. For those 65 plus, the reorganized club already has 35 members and is still growing.

“We were previously called the Tewksbury Township Seniors, but not enough people were coming,” said organizer Jim Reed. “Tewksbury doesn’t contribute anything to the club and we welcome non-residents. Only members can play bingo, though.”

Reed said no day trips have been planned yet, as they just began activities a few months ago, but they are looking into what excursions may be available. For more information, call Reed at (908) 439-2329.

In Readington Township there is a township sponsored seniors group for residents only, 60 plus in age. They meet at 12 noon on the third Wednesday of each month at Polish American Club in Whitehouse Station. They do, however, work jointly with a senior group in Raritan Borough to be able to fill a bus for their day trips. For more information, call club president Diane Anthony at (908) 534-4724.

Once out and about you will find a lot of the seniors have joined multiple clubs in the area to take advantage of more opportunities. In Bethlehem Township for example 80 percent of the members live there while 20 percent do not. Their minimum age is 55, and they meet at 12:30 a.m. for lunch on the first Monday of each month at 405 Mine Street, to the right of township hall. There are monthly programs, “out to lunches” and some day trips. For more information, call club president Sandra Bailey at (908) 917-8206.

“We try to offer a program every month,” said Bailey. “Our day trips are mostly by car-pooling, and the township provides us with a stipend for each trip.”

Lebanon Township does not have a senior club, but support the YMCA senior center on County Route 513 in Bunnvale with an annual $4,000 donation. Others communities like High Bridge, Clinton Town and Califon do not sponsor or financially support senior clubs; but you will find their residents involved with the other area clubs.

As part of a community outreach program, the sister facilities of Rolling Hills Care Center in Clinton Township and Hunterdon Care Center in Raritan Township, are a source for local groups to find informative speakers as well as entertainers for their meetings. They also run some day trips, and you don’t have to be a care center resident to go along. Most travelers are 50 plus years of age, but there are no age restrictions. For more information call director of community services Joani Lauyer at (908) 783-0116.

Their most successful outreach has been Bingo, held at 12 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at the VFW Hall on Main Street in Glen Gardner.

“It is a free program, but has become so popular we now need to have a head count beforehand,” said Lauyer. “We serve a full course luncheon, and last month 120 people came. We were worried we would run out of food.”

So don’t sit home bored, take advantage of all the fun times and new friends that are waiting for Hunterdon’s retired residents.

Keep an eye on the Hunterdon Review’s weekly “Things To Do” listing of upcoming events which will soon be adding more senior clubs in northern Hunterdon including speakers and upcoming excursions.

 


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Springtime events are busting out all over in Hunterdon County

Springtime events are busting out all over in Hunterdon County

Reposted from NJ.com

Now that spring is here, events are popping up all over the area. People are ready to get outside, interact with others, and participate in what’s going on.

* All of Lambertville will be coming alive this weekend. It’s the 37th annual Shad Fest, set for Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29. Shops, stores, galleries and eateries will be welcoming guests from far and near. Bell’s Tavern at 75 Bridge St. will be offering crab cakes and enjoy beer and wine at the Beer Garden. Most places will be opening at noon both days.

* Prallsville Mills is holding the annual Rummage Sale on Saturday, April 28, 9 to 4 and on Sunday, 9 to noon, with half-price kicking in noon to 2. Expect many different gently-used goodies – clothing and accessories, household decor and artworks, kitchen stuff, DVDs, video games and books, tools and hardware, sports equipment and musical instruments. The big sale is located at 33 Risler St., Stockton.

***

Next weekend, Saturday and Sunday, May 5-6, the Clinton Community Center will come alive with the One Spirit Festival. It is the 10th year of this popular event that attracts upwards of 500 people. It runs 10 to 5 both days at 63 Halstead St.

“We’ll have about 40 booths both inside and outside in tents,” said Christina Lynn Whited. “Vendors will have the opportunity to give half-hour lectures and meet with individuals.” Christina is the organizer of this big event.

One Spirit Festival is where the general public meets and interacts with the metaphysical community. For complete information, visit OneSpiritFestival.org, and access the vendors with descriptions of their specialties at that site.

In addition to channelers and readers and mediums and healers, expect practitioners in acupuncture, chiropractic, aromatherapy, astrology, Reiki, reflexology, shiatsu, authors and more. On hand will be specialists in crystals and jewelry, handmade crafts, diet, wellness, handmade crafts plus others. Food will be available, along with door prizes.

“I am doing more pottery and painting these days,” said Laney Britten. She hails from Annandale and will be on hand at One Spirit Festival. “We offer computerized astrology reports.”

Years ago, Peter Jarvis bought some Himalayan salt lamps. It started him on his journey with crystals. He tells visitors, “You’re not here to pick out a crystal. The crystal will speak to you and picks you out.” He will be offering crystals as well as books at the show.

Sue Ann Seccia-Harnden and her colleague Virangini Cindy Rounsaville are looking forward to the One Spirit Festival. They are known as The Holistic Pet Gals and they will be giving a talk “Holistic Pet: Unleashing Your Pet’s Inner Healer to Address Everyday Common Issues Safely and Naturally.” Bring your questions for some serious answers your pet will appreciate, and connect with The Holistic Pet Gals for their on-going work with pet parents.

***

Christina Lynn Whited is a busy woman. Not only does she organize and oversee the One Spirit Festival in the spring and again in the fall, she also operates a store. It’s called Inside/Out and it is located at 76 Main St. in High Bridge. Access at InsideOutOnMain.com.

In this one-of-a-kind shop, you’ll find crystals, fairies, angels, books, metaphysical tools and other items both decorative and nostalgic. Handmade items crowd the floor and shelves. They are for home and personal use, including statuary of wizards, unicorns and animals.

She also operates the CircleOfIntention.com. Various products and services are offered here, including accessibility to tools and techniques in self help, emotional healing, aura clearing, and private consultations.

For more info, call Christina at 908-638-9066 and visit the websites listed above.

***

Mario Russo runs RC Collectibles and he is holding a Customer Appreciation Day on Saturday, May 5, noon to 6 p.m. He is heavy into sports collectibles, as well as nostalgia, and some heavy weights will be on hand for the day’s activities.

“It’s a cool event with great guests who will be meeting people and taking questions,” Mario said.

Special guests include legendary major league umpire Al Clark, baseball original Mets baseball great Frank Thomas and nationally recognized artist James Fiorentino.

“With every purchase now until the big day, receive raffle tickets for our grand prize drawing,” said Mario. “When the wheel spins, it’s a chance to win a Mickey Mantle autographed baseball, an Aaron Judge signed card, James Fiorentino sports art, a $100 gift card and more.”

There’s more. At 2:45 p.m. there’s a baseball pack break at $35 per seat. The silent auction goes on all day until 6 p.m. Frank Thomas will be signing autographs beginning at 3:30, and Al Clark will sign beginning at 4. Break is set to begin at 5 for a round table featuring all three guests with a Q & A session.

For more info, call 908-840-4698 and visit RCcollectibles.com. The store is located at 1060 Route 22 in Lebanon.

***

Harry Potter fans will be excited to attend the Potterheads’ Book Club meet on Saturday evening, May 5, from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at the Califon Book Shop.

This event focuses on the second Harry Potter book, The Chamber of Secrets. Led by Nora Cubberly, it includes a discussion, potion craft, pizza dinner and movie viewing. You should read the book before attending.

Space is limited, so RSVP to 908-832-6686. The event is $15 per potterhead. More at CalifonBookShop.com. The shop is located at 72 Main St., Califon.

 


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Why Outer Suburbs in the East and Midwest Have Stopped Booming

Why Outer Suburbs in the East and Midwest Have Stopped Booming

Reposted from the NYTimes.com

Many counties, including rich ones, are aging and experiencing more deaths than births, without growth through immigration or migration.

Hunterdon County, N.J., is rich. It ranks sixth nationally among counties in median household income, and has for decades exemplified the American outer-ring suburb.

But in one crucial measure, this exurban enclave 60 miles west of Manhattan resembles old mill communities in northern New England or impoverished regions of Appalachia. The measure is death as compared to birth, otherwise known by demographers as “natural increase.” In this case, it’s negative.

Hunterdon County residents gave birth to 3,590 babies between 2013 and 2016. But even more residents — 3,647 — died. Go back to a four-year period two decades earlier: 5,882 births, 2,947 deaths.

Some American communities that until recently were considered demographic boom towns are now caught up in a downward demographic mix: young people having fewer children, the boomer generation getting older. And migration patterns, stalled by the recession, are resuming, but only in certain parts of the country.

Through 2016, about one in four outer-ring suburbs were experiencing more deaths than births, including 18 of 30 such counties in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Some of the once-fastest-growing counties in the United States are growing no more, and nationwide, the birthrate has dropped to levels not seen since the Great Depression.

“It is one of the biggest puzzles of my career as a demographer,” said Kenneth Johnson, a sociologist at the University of New Hampshire who has studied the various components of population change for years. “Each year when new data comes out, I expect to see a significant uptick in births, but I have yet to see it.”

More than 1,200 counties in the United States — home to one in seven Americans — had a negative natural increase in population in

For many counties, this makes migration especially important for population stability and growth. Counties in the Northeast and Midwest that have traditionally lost residents to the South and West are having a harder time propping up their population numbers.

Some maintain their numbers because of immigration, but American immigration policy is now a subject of debate, and a smaller number of immigrants would put more pressure on counties facing population loss.

The nation’s sprawling growth pattern has taken its share of criticism; it’s associated with long-distance commuting, environmental degradation and urban decay. But population stagnation in places that had been growing will most likely bring its own sets of problems, including pressures on real estate values and eventual shrinking of political representation.

And it starts with babies. The estimated lifetime births per woman is down 16 percent from a recent peak in 2007.

New Census Bureau projections say that Americans over 65 will outnumber children under 18 for the first time in U.S. history by 2030, and that “a rising number of deaths will increasingly offset how much births are able to contribute to population growth.”

Migration dropped significantly during the recession, Mr. Johnson said, but has returned to pre-recession patterns, albeit at a slower pace. Florida, Texas and Arizona have all seen population inflows resume, for example, while states in the Northeast and Midwest that were losing residents

2016. In total, 1,700 counties experienced a negative natural increase at least one year this decade.

With new county-level census population estimates due out this week, demographers will track not just the population gains and losses but the components of change: births, deaths and the movement of people. And though migration (both immigration and moves from one state to another) gets most of the attention, changes in birth and death patterns are increasingly important to migration have resumed losing them.

Births, on the other hand, have not returned to pre-recession patterns. They’ve instead skewed sharply in a negative direction.

The number of deaths continued to rise during the recessionary period, but births have yet to rebound from the impact of the recession,” Mr. Johnson said.

This has been most pronounced in places that have long struggled economically, but it’s also now increasingly common in well-off suburbia.

In many areas, young people, besides having fewer children, are not as enamored of the suburbs as previous younger generations. This is especially true in cities experiencing urban revivals like New York.

“Millennials don’t want to be in outer suburbia,” said James W. Hughes, the emeritus dean of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University.

Whereas previous generations of young couples streamed ever farther out to the suburbs in search of larger lots and lower taxes, the current crop prefers Brooklyn, Jersey City and other locales close to the urban core.

Perhaps the largest symbol of Hunterdon County’s shifting demographics, Mr. Hughes said, is the million-square-foot hexagonal office building that lies abandoned in the county’s lush woodlands. Merck erected the environmentally friendly facility on 460 acres with much publicity in the early 1990s, only to pull up stakes 20 years later and move back to the suburbs’ inner ring.

When they built it, no expense was spared; now it’s just sitting there,” Mr. Hughes said, though local officials recently announced the company was in negotiations with a buyer.

Population had grown rapidly for years in the 11 outer ring counties of the New York metropolitan area, Mr. Hughes said. But those counties are all like Hunterdon: shrinking, with slowing migration and more deaths than births.

Enrollment at some Hunterdon County school districts is down by as much as 20 percent, he said, and although plenty of older residents remain in place, they will most likely end up paying more to live there as the tax base shrinks along with the population.

The birth-death ratio is declining faster in the suburbs of large cities than in the cities themselves, data compiled by the demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institution shows.

In 2008, there were 1.9 births for every death in what Brookings terms the “emerging” suburbs — places like Hunterdon County where the suburban foothold has not yet overtaken the rural character. Less than 10 years later, the ratio had dropped to 1.5, roughly the rate of rural America last decade.

Not only are many outer suburban counties aging, but they also tend to be disproportionately white, said Mr. Frey, which probably contributes to the falling birth-death ratio in suburban counties, since the birthrate is especially low for white women.

In some parts of the South and West, the birth-death imbalance is masked by increasing migration, which still drives population growth. The suburbs there are still popular and attract local, national and international migrants.

Yet many communities in the North are net exporters of migrants — more people leave than move in.

Mr. Johnson said the natality data resembles that of another time in history, but without the obvious economic explanation: “The only other time we’ve been in a situation like this has been in the Great Depression itself. There was a drop in women having children, especially young women, and they never made up for never having children young when they got older.”

 


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The Population Slowdown in the Outer Suburbs including Hunterdon County

The Population Slowdown in the Outer Suburbs including Hunterdon County

Many counties, including rich ones, are aging and experiencing more deaths than births, without growth through immigration or migration.

Reposted from the NY Times

March 21, 2018Hunterdon County, N.J., is rich. It ranks sixth nationally among counties in median household income, and has for decades exemplified the American outer-ring suburb.

But in one crucial measure, this exurban enclave 60 miles west of Manhattan resembles old mill communities in northern New England or impoverished regions of Appalachia. The measure is death as compared to birth, otherwise known by demographers as “natural increase.” In this case, it’s negative.

Hunterdon County residents gave birth to 3,590 babies between 2013 and 2016. But even more residents — 3,647 — died. Go back to a four-year period two decades earlier: 5,882 births, 2,947 deaths.

With new county-level census population estimates due out this week, demographers will track not just the population gains and losses but the components of change: births, deaths and the movement of people. And while migration, which counts people moving both domestically and immigration, gets most of the attention, changes in birth and death patterns are increasingly important.

Some American communities that until recently were considered demographic boom towns are now caught up in a downward demographic mix: young people having fewer children, the boomer generation getting older. And migration patterns, stalled by the recession, are resuming, but only in certain parts of the country.

Through 2016, about one in four outer-ring suburbs were experiencing more deaths than births, including 18 of 30 such counties in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Some of the once-fastest-growing counties in the United States are growing no more, and nationwide, the birthrate has dropped to levels not seen since the Great Depression.

“It is one of the biggest puzzles of my career as a demographer,” said Kenneth Johnson, a sociologist at the University of New Hampshire who has studied the various components of population change for years. “Each year when new data comes out, I expect to see a significant uptick in births, but I have yet to see it.”

More than 1,200 counties in the United States — home to one in seven Americans — had a negative natural increase in population in 2016. In total, 1,700 counties experienced a negative natural increase at least one year this decade.

For many counties, this makes migration especially important for population stability and growth. Counties in the Northeast and Midwest that have traditionally lost residents to the South and West are having a harder time propping up their population numbers.

Some maintain their numbers because of immigration, but American immigration policy is now a subject of debate, and a smaller number of immigrants would put more pressure on counties facing population loss.

The nation’s sprawling growth pattern has taken its share of criticism; it’s associated with long-distance commuting, environmental degradation and urban decay. But population stagnation in places that had been growing will most likely bring its own sets of problems, including pressures on real estate values and eventual shrinking of political representation.

And it starts with babies. The estimated lifetime births per woman is down 16 percent from its 2007 peak.

New Census Bureau projections say that Americans over 65 will outnumber children under 18 for the first time in U.S. history by 2030, and that “a rising number of deaths will increasingly offset how much births are able to contribute to population growth.”

Migration dropped significantly during the recession, Mr. Johnson said, but has returned to pre-recession patterns, albeit at a slower pace. Florida, Texas and Arizona have all seen population inflows resume, for example, while states in the Northeast and Midwest that were losing residents to migration have resumed losing them.

Births, on the other hand, have not returned to pre-recession patterns. They’ve instead skewed sharply in a negative direction.

“The number of deaths continued to rise during the recessionary period, but births have yet to rebound from the impact of the recession,” Mr. Johnson said.

This has been most pronounced in places that have long struggled economically, but it’s also now increasingly common in well-off suburbia.

In many areas, young people, besides having fewer children, not as enamored of the suburbs as previous younger generations. This is especially true in cities experiencing urban revivals like New York.

“Millennials don’t want to be in outer suburbia,” said James W. Hughes, the emeritus dean of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University.

Whereas previous generations of young couples streamed ever farther out to the suburbs in search of larger lots and lower taxes, the current crop prefers Brooklyn, Jersey City and other locales close to the urban core.

Perhaps the largest symbol of Hunterdon County’s shifting demographics, Mr. Hughes said, is the million-square-foot hexagonal office building that lies abandoned in the county’s lush woodlands. Merck erected the environmentally friendly facility on 460 acres with much publicity in the early 1990s, only to pull up stakes 20 years later and move back to the suburbs’ inner ring.

“When they built it, no expense was spared; now it’s just sitting there,” Mr. Hughes said, though local officials recently announced the company was in negotiations with a buyer.

Population had grown rapidly for years in the 11 outer ring counties of the New York metropolitan area, Mr. Hughes said. But those counties are all like Hunterdon: shrinking, with slowing migration and more deaths than births.

Enrollment at some Hunterdon County school districts is down by as much as 20 percent, he said, and although plenty of older residents remain in place, they will most likely end up paying more to live there as the tax base shrinks along with the population.

The birth-death ratio is declining faster in the suburbs of large cities than in the cities themselves, data compiled by the demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institution shows.

In 2008, there were 1.9 births for every death in what Brookings terms the “emerging” suburbs — places like Hunterdon County where the suburban foothold has not yet overtaken the rural character. Less than 10 years later, the ratio had dropped to 1.5, roughly the rate of rural America last decade.

Not only are many outer suburban counties aging, but they also tend to be disproportionately white, said Mr. Frey, which probably contributes to the falling birth-death ratio in suburban counties, since the birthrate is especially low for white women.

In some parts of the South and West, the birth-death imbalance is masked by increasing migration, which still drives population growth. The suburbs there are still popular and attract local, national and international migrants.

Yet many communities in the North are net exporters of migrants — more people leave than move in.

Mr. Johnson said the natality data resembles that of another time in history, but without the obvious economic explanation: “The only other time we’ve been in a situation like this has been in the Great Depression itself. There was a drop in women having children, especially young women, and they never made up for never having children young when they got older.”


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Deeds filed with the Hunterdon County Clerk’s Office through Dec. 7

Deeds filed with the Hunterdon County Clerk’s Office through Dec. 7

The following deeds have been reported to have been recorded in the Hunterdon County Hall of Records in Books 2419, 2420 and 2421 through Dec. 7, 2017:

Alexandria

Angie Doswald to Robert Hendelion, property at 8 Rupells Road, at $350,000.

Mark S. Cody and Tara M. Cody to Neil S. Tiffany, property at 549 County Road 13, at $319,000.

Elizabeth Innella to Bruce Alatary, property at 40 Old Boonton Road, at $99,900.

Joseph A. Glennon to Joanne M. Glennon, property at 346 Creek Road Milford, at $515,000.

Jennifer L. Grossman to Gregory Kokolski and Katherine Kokolski, property at 208 Rick Road, at $347,000.

Bethlehem

Charles Edward Nelson to Kevin J. Kelly, Jr. and Kristin A. Kelly, property at 70 Staats Road, at $350,050.

Constance L. Knigge to Matthew S. Wood, property at 222 Asbury-West Portal Road, at $1,200,000.

Jospeh A. Kohan and Lisa K. Kohan to Theresa Conover and Ryan Messinger, property at 12 Kensington Court, at $454,000.

Jospeh Tesauro and Renae B. Tesauro to Robert Moran and Marguerite Moran, property at 14 Woodbrook Drive, at $490,000.

Califon

Jennifer Jensen to Trevor Newcomb and Nicole Newcomb, property at 14 Academy Street, at $265,000.

Elissa Curtis and Benson Goodwyn to 10 Center LLC, property at 10 Center Street, at $299,990

Clinton Twp.

Terence J. Braver to Carl R. Meixsell, property at 21 Summit Court, at $161,000.

Rose Investment, Inc. to Jonathan Moss and Simona Moss, property at 158 West Main Street, at $435,000.

Patricia Willis to Albert D. Rylak and Elizabeth Scannell, property at 2 La Jolla Lane, at $455,000.

David J. Williams and Maria C. Williams to Stephen Bennett and Maria Bennett, property at 16 Treeline Drive, at $552,000.

Jamie B. Szewczuk to Patrick Yancey, property at 9 weimer Road, at $290,000.

Dana Botti and Rhett S. Peppi to John C. Turner, property at 24 Weadowview Drive, at $186,000.

Fernando Geraci and Maria Gabriela Geraci to Dale Ann LEta, property at 6 Mission Hills Road, at $268,000.

Kurt Jacobsen and Kathleen A. Jacobsen to Jaroslaw Wierciszewski and Anna Wierciszewski, property at 7 Round Top Drive, at $238,300.

Ryan Duveneck and Ellen Duveneck to Noah Frohlich, property at 115 Westchester Terrace, at $229,000.

Robert P. Schaming to Wettstein Ketih and Dialfonso Nicole, property at 4 Chalfonte Drive, at $415,000.

Fannie Mae to James Valanzola and Nancy Valanzola, property at 274 Stanton Mountain Road, at $199,900.

Clinton

Emmanuel Patel and Susan Patel to Elhadji Dia, property at 8 Lingert Avenue, at $300,000.

Estate of Walter R. Buczek to Alexander Stiles Bauer, property at 1 Allerton Road, at $330,000.

Kenneth W. Sigvardson to Susan P. Sigvardson, property at 7 Saddle Ridge Drivem at $592,500.

Per Berger to Sallie M. Woods, property at 55 Meadowview Drive, at $189,900.

Brian H. Tarulli and Dyana Tarulli to Borui Liu and Yanhua Yuan, property at 11 Jumping Brook Place, at $333,000.

Charles Most and Christine Most to Lucas Cusimano and Marisa Cusimano, property at 20 Halstead Street, at $575,000.

JFI Property Holdings LLC to Kenneth Marko, Margaret Ann Marko, Justin P. McCabe and Amanda McCabe, property at 36 Red Schoolhouse Road, at $507,500.

James Maroldi to Charles Thomas and Tangeria Thomas, property at 26 Troon Terrace, at $124,400.

William H. Roberts and Maryann P. Roberts to Michael Slavin and Ariann Boylan, property at 2 Orchid Place, at $395,000.

Antje Doyle to Mark A. Dileo, Jr. and Catherine R. Dileo, property at 8 Stanton Grange Road, at $420,000.

Anjit Dandekar to Kyle Ruhl, property at 15 Hickory Court, at $267,000.

LaSalle Bank National Association to Lingert Properties, LLC, property at 38 Lingert Ave., to $160,000.

Anthony G. Piazza to Claudia E. Rocca, property at 55 Sam Bonnell Drive, at $365,000

Thomas O’Sullivan and Doris O’Sullivan to Joanna Smith and Paul Eichert, property at 30 Georges Place, at $305,000.

Delaware Township

Norma J. Cheston to Jon P. Mourar and Graciela Caldero, property at177 Locktown Flemington Road, at $175,000.

Raymond Steele and Annette Dursi to Michael Bord and Dana Maria Bord, property at 18 Dogwood Drive, at $440,000.

540 Rosemont LLC to Sheriff of Hunterdon County, property at 540 Rosemont Ringoes Road, at $153,000.

D. Nils Knutzen and Mary R. Clifford to Charles E. Banks, property at 24 Sandbrook Headquarters Road, at $500,000.

Brian L. Vocke to Laurie L. Vocke, property at 36 Zentek Road, at $330,000.

East Amwell

Thomas P. Thatcher and Gretchen S. Thatcher to Christopher Clark, property at 21 Wagner Road, at $365,000.

Kaitlin Meiser and  Shaun Morris to Matthew Raja and Allison Milack, property at 9 Fox Hunt Road, at $394,900.

Robin A. Hauck to Steven Rivera and Lorena Rivera, property at 19 Vones Lane, at $300,000.

Flemington

Jeffrey R. Lutley and Claire T. Lutley to Willard h. Richardson and Wendy L. Richardson, property at 35 Spring Street, at $365,000.

Richard Dilley to Nicholas MacKay and Yolanda MacKay, property at 18 East Main Street, at $245,000.